Culture

GoErie.com reports on Shadeland Camp

GoErie.com reports on Shadeland Camp
GoErie.com reports on Shadeland Camp
GoErie.com reports on Shadeland Camp
GoErie.com reports on Shadeland Camp

SPRINGBORO — There’s more going on at St. Sava Camp this week than what a visitor might see in the dining hall and down at the waterfront.

Campers are learning the tamburitza, which is a presentation of ethnic Serbian folk dance and music.

Dating to the 1950s, four weeklong camps are hosted each summer at St. Sava Camp, in the village of Shadeland, near Springboro in Spring Township, Crawford County.

The camp is on the grounds of what once was the Monastery of Holy Mother of God. The summer camp brings together children ages 10 to 17 from the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Eastern America, which stretches across the East Coast from Maine to Florida.

This week is the last of the four weeks, and the highlight is the camp’s tamburitza group.

“It’s a dance that’s been danced for so many decades,” said the Rev. George Veselinovic, who is serving as camp pastor.

7 Holy Youths “Seven Sleepers” of Ephesus

The Seven Youths of Ephesus: Maximilian, Iamblicus, Martinian, John, Dionysius, Exacustodianus (Constantine) and Antoninus, lived in the third century. Saint Maximilian was the son of the Ephesus city administrator, and the other six youths were sons of illustrious citizens of Ephesus. The youths were friends from childhood, and all were in military service together.

When the emperor Decius (249-251) arrived in Ephesus, he commanded all the citizens to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods. Torture and death awaited anyone who disobeyed. The seven youths were denounced by informants, and were summoned to reply to the charges. Appearing before the emperor, the young men confessed their faith in Christ.

Our Father among the Saints John [Maximovitch], Archbishop of Shanghai and San Francisco

Our Father among the Saints John (Maximovitch), Archbishop of Shanghai and San Francisco (1896-1966), was a diocesan bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR) who served widely from China to France to the United States.

Saint John departed this life on June 19 (O.S.) / July 2 (N.S.), 1966, and was officially glorified by the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad on July 2, 1994. His glorification was later recognized for universal veneration by the Patriarchate of Moscow on July 2, 2008.

The future Saint John was born on June 4, 1896, in the village of Adamovka in Kharkiv province to pious aristocrats, Boris and Glafira Maximovitch. He was given the baptismal name of Michael, after the Holy Archangel Michael. In his youth, Michael was sickly and had a poor appetite, but he displayed an intense religious interest. He was educated at the Poltava Military School (1907-14); Kharkiv Imperial University, from which he received a law degree (in 1918); and the University of Belgrade (where he completed his theological education in 1925).

St. Justin Popovich (of Celije)

Mottos: “In Christianity truth is not a philosophical concept nor is it a theory, a teaching, or a system, but rather, it is the living theanthropic hypostasis—the historical Jesus Christ (John 14:6). Before Christ men could only conjecture about the Truth since they did not possess it. With Christ as the incarnate divine Logos the eternally complete divine Truth enters into the world. For this reason the Gospel says: “Truth came by Jesus Christ” (John 1:17).”

“The first truth of Orthodoxy is that man does not exist for the sake of man, but for the sake of God or, more fully, for the sake of the God-man. Therefore, we stay with the God-man in the name of man. In Him alone is an understanding of man’s being possible; in Him alone is a justification for man’s existence possible. All the mysteries of heaven and earth are attained in this truth, all the values of all the worlds that man can contemplate, all the joys of all the perfections that man can attain.”

“Whether in Africa Or Russia, Orthodox Parish Life Is Basically the Same”

“Whether in Africa Or Russia, Orthodox Parish Life Is Basically the Same”
“Whether in Africa Or Russia, Orthodox Parish Life Is Basically the Same”
“Whether in Africa Or Russia, Orthodox Parish Life Is Basically the Same”
“Whether in Africa Or Russia, Orthodox Parish Life Is Basically the Same”

A talk with the rector of the Church of St. Sergius of Radonezh in Johannesburg (South Africa), Archpriest Daniel Lugovoy

The parish in honor of St. Sergius, Abbot of Radonezh and Wonderworker of All Russia, was founded in the city of Johannesburg in the Republic of South Africa by the decision of the Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church on December 29, 1998.

Review of Following the Holy Fathers by Fr. Theodore Zisis

Following the Holy Fathers: Essays on the Timeless Guides of Authentic Christianity is a collection of essays written by Greek Patrologist Theodoros Zisis (translated by Rev Dr John Palmer), published by Newrome Press.

Brief description: This book represents a collection of valuable scholarship covering both a broad range of Patristic figures dating from apostolic times to the present day, as well as a wide variety of themes. Moreover, it paints a roughly representative picture of one of Greece’s most important modern Patristic scholars and effectively introduces him to the English-speaking world. Most importantly, though, this volume offers to show readers how an authentic Orthodox Patrologist relates to the lives, text, and teachings of the Holy Fathers.