Culture

Virtual tour of exhibition dedicated to New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia opened on the website of St. Tikhon's Orthodox University

A virtual tour of the exhibition, “Overcoming: the Russian Church and the Soviet government” has opened on the website of the St. Tikhon’s Orthodox University of Humanities. The largest exposition, dedicated to the persecution of the Church during the Soviet era, became available to internet users ahead of the completion of restoration of the Moscow diocesan house in Likhov Lane Moscow.

Over the two month since it was opened, more than 7,000 people attended the exhibition in memory of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia, organized by St. Tikhon’s University in the winter of 2012/2013 at the Museum of the Contemporary Russian History. The unique exhibits were collected in various corners of the former Soviet Union, and included the saints’ personal things; various documents reflecting the government’s theomachic policy and the Church’s reaction to it; and items used in the underground liturgical life the existed in labor camps.

"Talija" Music and Dance in Columbus

Talija, the breathtaking music and dance troupe from Belgrade, Serbia, is currently making their Great USA Tour 2014.  We are pleased to announce that they will be in concert for one night only, Tuesday, October 21, performing Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian and other Slavic dances, at Capital University's Mees Auditorium, located at 1 College Avenue and East Main Street in the Bexley neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio.  Sponsored by St. Stevan of Dechani Serbian Orthodox Church, the concert begins at 7:00 p.m.

Orthodox Food Festival

Orthodox Food Festival
Orthodox Food Festival
Orthodox Food Festival
Orthodox Food Festival

For the second year in a row the St. George Serbian Orthodox Church in Hermitage, Pennsylvania hosted the Orthodox Food Festival, held this past weekend September 20-21, 2014.

Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections

Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections
Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections
Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections
Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections

Saturday, September 27, 2014 – Sunday, February 15, 2015 - Gallery 154

Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections presents 63 superb artworks from the early Christian and Byzantine eras in the Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art. Originally exhibited at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the exhibition represents major artistic holdings from Greece—many of which have never been exhibited outside that country—consisting of shimmering mosaics, architectural fragments, manuscripts, luxury glass, silver, personal adornments, liturgical textiles, and painted icons. The Art Institute’s display offers a selection of exceptional works from the original exhibition, including the debut of the 14th-century Icon of Saint Prokopios.

100th anniversary commemoration of serbian composer’s death

If you have ever attended a choral festival on this continent, you probably heard at least one of his compositions. If you have ever attended a Divine Liturgy responded to by a choir, you have probably heard one of his arrangements during the service.  Even if you attended liturgy responded to by a single chanter, they probably sang a traditional church hymn notated by Stevan Stojanovic Mokranjac, one of the most significant composers in Serbian history /program and  poster/.

Three flavors of Orthodox Christianity in Anchorage

In the past several months I’ve visited four Orthodox churches in Anchorage representing three branches of Orthodox Christianity. The Orthodox faith traces its roots in Christianity back to apostolic (early church) times. Eastern and Western Christianity mutually separated in the 11th century.

Anchorage Orthodox churches represent Greek, Antiochian, and Russian Orthodox. It’s like eating ice cream. You can have many flavors of ice cream, but it’s ice cream nonetheless. I’ll attempt to describe some of the flavors of each in this column.