Palms Sunday Celebrated in Damascus

Palms Sunday Celebrated in Damascus
Palms Sunday Celebrated in Damascus
Palms Sunday Celebrated in Damascus
Palms Sunday Celebrated in Damascus

His Holiness Patriarch Mor Ignatius Aphrem II celebrated the Holy Qurobo on the occasion of Palms Sunday at St. Georges Patriarchal Cathedral in Bab Touma, Damascus. His Eminence Mor Timotheos Matta Al-Khoury, Patriarchal Vicar in the Patriarchal Archdiocese of Damascus assisted His Holiness during the Holy Qurobo.

Memorial Day for victims of Jasenovac concentration camp

The Memorial Day for the victims of Jasenovac marks the date of the liberation of this concentration camp run by the Ustasha, one of the worst death camps in World War Two Europe, which some historians have dubbed the Serbian Auschwitz.

April 22 was picked as the Memorial Day because a group of 1,075 prisoners tried to break out of the camp on that day in 1945. Only 127 got through.

Brotherhood of Greek, Serbian peoples forged for eternity

Serbian President Tomislav Nikolic, who is leading a delegation to a ceremony marking the centenary of the Serbian army’s landing on the Ionian island of Corfu, has said that the brotherhood of the Greek and Serbian peoples was then forged for eternity, woven into our being forever, as part of Serbia’s heroic history.

Two Christian Bishops Were Kidnapped : Has a ‘Silent’ World Forgotten Them?

It’s been two years since two top Christian clergymen were kidnapped by gunmen in Syria, prompting the brother of one of the victims – himself a senior cleric – to raise alarm that “the world is silent.”“We hope that the bishops are alive, but unfortunately, the world is silent and nobody has provided physical evidence,” Orthodox Patriarch John X of Antioch said last week on the anniversary of their disappearance. . .

The two religious leaders, Syriac Orthodox Archbishop Yohanna Ibrahim and Greek Orthodox Archbishop Boulos Yazigi, were kidnapped by gunmen in April 2013 when they were on their way back from the Turkish border to their city of Aleppo.

Latin versions of the Bible

A. The Greek Bible in Latin (Old Latin)

1. Origin. During the first centuries of Christian expansion, the vernacular language of the Mediterranean world was mainly Greek, even in the West. The books of the OT were read in the early Christian churches according to the LXX and the NT in Greek. When the necessity arose—as early as the 2d century in Roman Africa—the Bible was translated into Latin from the Greek. In many places,Tertullian (ca. 160–220) used a Latin version already at his disposal, certain peculiarities of which remained throughout the history of the Latin Bible. When, in the middle of the 3d century, Cyprian, bishop of Carthage, quoted Scripture at great length and not from memory (Libri III ad Quirinum, commonly called Testimonia), he did it according to a Latin translation which was itself a revision and had already a complex history. This process of successive revisions continued for centuries and is aspecial feature of the Latin Bible. The Acta martyrum, in Africa again, mention sacred books as early as180.