Christian world

Help our brother Rasko Milenkovic who suffers from leukemia

The operation in this month was postponed twice due to lack of money. Father of three underage children is undergoing medical treatment in Germany and is awaiting our help!

Telekom Serbia provided except number 1801 for texting SMS, also a humanitarian number for call from the fixed phone network - 0900-501-501 which can be dialled from any fixed phone in Serbia and you automatically donate 59 dinars. From mobile MTS network, the call costs 177 dinars.

The Information Service of the Serbian Orthodox Church joined the humanitarian action of collecting resources for the Rasko's operation.

All interested for help can visit the facebook group entitled " Let's help Rasko Milenkovic to fight leukemia" which has more than 29000 members: http://www.facebook.com/groups/RaskoMilenkovic/

Births and Deaths

The results of the recently completed census have yet to be completed, but one is already known – there are fewer people in Serbia. Every year a town of about forty thousand inhabitants disappears. Warnings have come true, warnings of demographers who have been sending dramatic messages primarily to authorities to do everything possible in order to approach this problem seriously, and, above all, influence fertility rate increase by economic measures.

Catering for the poor in Kosovo and Metohija

Services catering for the poor in Kosovo and Metohija have for years been working in very difficult conditions and would not be able to survive but for help from individuals and associations. The aid of more than one million dinars, which the Football Association of Serbia recently sent to the village of Prekovac, near Kosovska Kamenica, the centre of catering for the poor in Kosmet, is very important for the continuation of work of such services. Snežana Milošević reports from Kosovska Mitrovica.

Tradition runs deep at St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church in Broadview Heights

John and Angie Majerle, parishioners at St. Sava Serbian Orthodox in Broadview Heights, were gracious enough to share their Christmas tradition story and three recipes.

Mir Bozji! Hristos Se Rodi!

Christmas is one of the holiest days of the year for Serbian Orthodox Christians who follow the Julian calendar. It is preceded by 40 days of fasting during Advent to prepare for the birth of Christ. No meat, dairy or eggs are consumed, continuing through Christmas Eve night — (badnje vece) — on Jan. 6 (Dec. 24 on the Julian calendar).