5th-6th century Christian monuments discovered in Saudi Arabia

Ancient monuments of Christian culture have been discovered in the sands of the southern desert of Saudi Arabia, reports the Linga portal with the reference to news agencies.   

It is reported that a French-Saudi team of archaeologists carrying out excavations in the desert of the Najran region has discovered numerous inscriptions, carved on the Kaukab mountain around the 5th - early 6th centuries AD. Specifically, experts in the Nabataean language managed to identify the words “Murtad” and “Rabi”, mentioned in the so-called Book of Himyarites – the list of names of the Najran Martyrs who suffered for Christ in around 470-475 (but most probably c. 522) under the usurper Yusuf (Dhu Nuwas) the apostate, who converted to Judaism.

PACE recognizes facts of discrimination against Christians in Europe

On 29 January 2015, Resolution 2036 (2015) tackling intolerance and discrimination in Europe was adopted at the winter session of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe.

The Parliamentary Assembly called on the Council of Europe member States to ensure that the right of all individuals to freedom of religion and belief is respected, uphold the freedom of conscience in the workplace, promote reasonable accommodation so as to encourage the media to avoid negative stereotyping against Christians, in the same way as for any other group, and respect the right of parents to provide their children with education in conformity with their religious convictions.

Site of Jesus’s trial may have been uncovered in Jerusalem

“And David dwelt in the stronghold, and called it the city of David.
And David built round about from Millo and inward.” (2 Samuel 5:9)

Archaeologists have announced they may have uncovered the precise location of Jesus’s trial, and it’s not along the traditional Via Dolorosa path, Haaretz reported.

Greek Mystery of a “Lost Church” in Ancient Nicaea

A group of archeologists recently discovered a Church on the shore of the Lake İznik. İznik, historically known as ancient city of Greece called  Nicaea, is a town and an administrative district in the Province of Bursa, Turkey. The town lies in a fertile basin at the eastern end of Lake İznik where the remains of an ancient basilica have been discovered.

The big church was built under the name of St. Neophytos a beloved Christian in the middle ages. According to the pundits’ calculations, the church collapsed during an earthquake that occurred in the region in 740. The church was built in honor of St, Neophytos who was killed as a Christian Martyr by Roman soldiers in 303 before the Edict of Milan, and a proclamation that permanently established religious toleration for Christianity within the Roman Empire.

Archbishop Jovan (Vraniskovsky) of Ohrid released from prison

Statement by the Communication Service of the Moscow Patriarchate department for external church relations and the Information Service of the Serbian Orthodox Church.

On February 2, 2015, in compliance with the ruling of the Skopje Court, Archbishop Jovan (Vraniskovsky) of Ohrid, a hierarch of the Serbian Orthodox Church, was released from the Idrizovo prison.

ISIS Opens Market in Mosul for Stolen Assyrian Property

ISIS has opened a special market to sell property it looted from Assyrian homes and churches in Mosul. The market, called “Spoils Of The Nazarenes,” sells televisions, refrigerators, microwave ovens and other electronic devices, as well as furniture and artwork. Prices range from 50,000 to 75,000 Iraqi Dinars ($42 to $63).

Timeline of ISIS in North Iraq