Science

The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes

The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes

The Entry into Jerusalem is one of the most important events in the last earthly days of our Lord Jesus Christ. The Savior's triumphant arrival at the Holy City on the eve of the Passover preceded His Passion, and was the manifestation of the Old Testament prophecies. The source for the iconography of the Lord's Entry into Jerusalem is the Gospels, where it is related how Christ enters the city seated on the foal of an ass, accompanied by His disciples on the eve of the Judaic Passover, were He will be betrayed to be crucified. The image of the Savior seated on the foal is well known even in early Christian art.

 

Jesus' Entry into Jerusalem - Palm Sunday

On the Sunday before Pascha, the Holy Church celebrates the Entrance of the Lord into Jerusalem. Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead (John 12:1). While tarrying there, in the house of Lazarus, many of those who had accompanied Him on the way from Jericho managed to reach Jerusalem and spread the tidings that Christ the Savior was coming there for the Feast of the Passover, and had stopped for a while in Bethany. Hearing this news, Christ's enemies, the scribes and Pharisees came to Bethany, not only on account of Jesus but also to see Lazarus, Whom He had raised from the dead (John 12:9).

The Decline of the Patriarchate of Constantinople

An overview in 1938

The following article, which is part of a report on all the Autocephalous Churches made by Archbishop John to the Second All-Diaspora Sobor of the Russian Church Abroad held in Yugoslavia in 1938, gives the historical background of the present state of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. It could well have been written today, apart from a few small points which have changed since then. We reproduce it here to bring more clarity into the current ecclesiastical crisis surrounding the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the Ukraine.

The primacy among Orthodox Churches is possessed by the Church of the New Rome, Constantinople, which is headed by a Patriarch who has the title of Ecumenical, and therefore is itself called the Ecumenical Patriarchate, which territorially reached the culmination of its development at the end of the 18th century. At that time there was included in it the whole of Asia Minor, the whole Balkan Peninsula (except for Montenegro), together with the adjoining islands, since the other independent Churches in the Balkan Peninsula had been abolished and had become part of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The Ecumenical Patriarch had received from the Turkish Sultan, even before the taking of Constantinople by the Turks, the title of Millet Bash, that is, the head of the people, and he was considered the head of the whole Orthodox population of the Turkish Empire. This, however, did not prevent the Turkish government from removing patriarchs for any reason whatever and calling for new elections, at the same time collecting a large tax from the newly elected patriarch. Apparently the latter circumstance had a great significance in the changing of patriarchs by the Turks, and therefore it often happened that they again allowed on the Patriarchal Throne a patriarch whom they had removed, after the death of one or several of his successors. Thus, many patriarchs occupied their see several times, and each accession was accompanied by the collection of a special tax from them by the Turks.

If nothing, else, the true faith

Fr. Srboljub Miletich was born on November, 14 1953 in Krusevac, Serbia, to the V. Rev. Professor Milun and Olivera Miletich. He graduated from the St. Cyril and Methodius Seminary in Prizren, Kosovo in 1973, and from the Department of Theology of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Beograd, Serbia in 1982.

Fr. Srba has been serving the Church in Australia since 1983. He was Dean of the Serbian Orthodox St Stephen Church in Rooty Hill, NSW from 1994 to 2007, and is currently a member of the Serbian Orthodox Metropolitanate of Australia and New Zealand Executive Board. Fr. Srba is the author of numerous Orthodox books and articles, including a history of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Australia and New Zealand.

Lenten Prayer of St. Ephrem

O Lord and Master of my life, take from me the spirit of sloth, despair, lust of power, and idle talk.

But give rather the spirit of chastity, humility, patience, and love to Thy servant.

Yea, O Lord and King, grant me to see my own transgressions, and not to judge my brother, for blessed art Thou, unto ages of ages. Amen.