Science

The Decline of the Patriarchate of Constantinople

An overview in 1938

The following article, which is part of a report on all the Autocephalous Churches made by Archbishop John to the Second All-Diaspora Sobor of the Russian Church Abroad held in Yugoslavia in 1938, gives the historical background of the present state of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. It could well have been written today, apart from a few small points which have changed since then. We reproduce it here to bring more clarity into the current ecclesiastical crisis surrounding the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the Ukraine.

The primacy among Orthodox Churches is possessed by the Church of the New Rome, Constantinople, which is headed by a Patriarch who has the title of Ecumenical, and therefore is itself called the Ecumenical Patriarchate, which territorially reached the culmination of its development at the end of the 18th century. At that time there was included in it the whole of Asia Minor, the whole Balkan Peninsula (except for Montenegro), together with the adjoining islands, since the other independent Churches in the Balkan Peninsula had been abolished and had become part of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The Ecumenical Patriarch had received from the Turkish Sultan, even before the taking of Constantinople by the Turks, the title of Millet Bash, that is, the head of the people, and he was considered the head of the whole Orthodox population of the Turkish Empire. This, however, did not prevent the Turkish government from removing patriarchs for any reason whatever and calling for new elections, at the same time collecting a large tax from the newly elected patriarch. Apparently the latter circumstance had a great significance in the changing of patriarchs by the Turks, and therefore it often happened that they again allowed on the Patriarchal Throne a patriarch whom they had removed, after the death of one or several of his successors. Thus, many patriarchs occupied their see several times, and each accession was accompanied by the collection of a special tax from them by the Turks.

If nothing, else, the true faith

Fr. Srboljub Miletich was born on November, 14 1953 in Krusevac, Serbia, to the V. Rev. Professor Milun and Olivera Miletich. He graduated from the St. Cyril and Methodius Seminary in Prizren, Kosovo in 1973, and from the Department of Theology of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Beograd, Serbia in 1982.

Fr. Srba has been serving the Church in Australia since 1983. He was Dean of the Serbian Orthodox St Stephen Church in Rooty Hill, NSW from 1994 to 2007, and is currently a member of the Serbian Orthodox Metropolitanate of Australia and New Zealand Executive Board. Fr. Srba is the author of numerous Orthodox books and articles, including a history of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Australia and New Zealand.

Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Three

Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Three
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Three
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Three
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Three

The final day of the Sts. Sebastian and Mardarije Institute began as clergy and laity arrived for the morning Matins served by Fr. Daniel Kirk, followed by breakfast.

Afterwards, Bishop Maxim announced the beginning of the next talk which would be a combination of the morning and afternoon talks: God Views Us through Love and Becoming Human Today.

Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Two

Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Two
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Two
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Two
Sts. Sebastian & Mardarije Orthodox Institute – Day Two

The first full day of the Sts. Sebastian and Mardarije Orthodox Institute began early Wednesday morning, 27 February the feast day of St. Cyril Equal of the Apostles, teacher of the Slavs, with the Holy Hierarchical Divine Liturgy.

His Grace Bishop Ignjatije of Branichevo officiated at the Eucharistic gathering with the concelebration of Their Graces: Bishop Longin of New Gracanica and Midwest America, Bishop Mitrophan of Canada and Bishop Maxim of Western America, together with clergy from dioceses nationwide. During the liturgy, Deacon John Suvak was ordained to the priesthood.

On Christian Faith and Life According to the Gospel

Yesterday marks two years since the repose of Russia’s great elder, Archimandrite Kirill (Pavlov). In his memory we have translated one of his sermons on a very essential aspect of his own life—a life of reading the Gospel and living according to it.

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit!

Dear brothers and sisters! From the time that the Divine Sufferer, our Lord Jesus Christ, spilled His divine and priceless blood on Golgotha for the salvation of the whole world, the foundation of the Christian faith was placed on the earth. The teaching of Jesus Christ, known to us from the Gospel, began to quickly spread throughout the world. And the people who accepted Christ believed in Him as the Son of God, accepted His teaching, and were called Christians. At the present time also many millions of people consider themselves Christians, and that means that they acknowledge the Gospel as the foremost book in the world; as a book which contains the teaching of our Lord Jesus Christ about how we must live here on earth in order to be worthy after death, beyond the grave, of eternal, blessed life, as well as have earthly prosperity in this life. But what is amazing and to our great sorrow, very few people actually follow what is written in the Gospel. Most do not even pick up the Gospel and do not test themselves according to the it.